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Home / News / News / Bus strike finally sees light at the end of the tunnel

BUS STRIKE FINALLY SEES LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL

Date: 2018-05-15

Bus strike finally sees light at the end of the tunnel 1

Bus strike finally sees light at the end of the tunnel 2

Bus strike finally sees light at the end of the tunnel 3

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It's been almost a month since the bus strike started but now bus drivers have officially ended their protracted strike after reaching a compromise wage settlement on Monday.

Bus drivers have agreed on 9% wage hike for the first year and 8% for the second year. The offer is backdated to April 17, when the strikes started.

Workers initially demanded that the wages be backdated to April 1.

While the Bargaining Council sent out a letter stating that all parties have agreed to end the strike, and that services will go back to normal on Tuesday, one bus company is apparently still refusing to agree until the signed agreement has been delivered.

Ironically the company concerned is Golden Arrow, which is owned by Hosken Consolidated Industries, where the DA Clothing and Textile Union's investment company has a major holding.

The strike saw 17,000 drivers take place in the event that brought the ground transportation services to a halt in many cities across the country, leaving commuters stranded.

The strike was supported by the South African Transport and Allied Workers Union, the Transport and Allied Workers Union of South Africa, the Transport and Omnibus Workers Union, the National Union of Mineworkers of South Africa and the Tirisano Transport and Services Workers Union.

Bus services which have been affected by the strike included Rae Vaya, the Gautrain, Putco and Megabus in Gauteng. In the city of Cape Town, the MyCiti and Golden Arrow bus service have been affected.

Last week, the Bargaining Council and the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) proposed an offer of 8.75% pay increases for the first year and 8.25% for the second.

However, the union initially demanded 12% salary hike across the board, among other demands.

Workers were also demanding compensation and conditions for dual drivers on long-distance buses and the in-sourcing of technical and other labour.